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LTH Profile Area: Engineering Health

In view of an aging society and the increasing demands on access to healthcare we need to find new solutions to alleviate the pressure on hospitals as well as primary care centers. Innovations that decentralize health care, without waiving quality, is a key demand for society.

The LTH Profile Area Engineering Health address these challenges in a multifaceted strategy where scientific excellence is key to provide new engineering solutions for medical needs in early diagnostics, point-of-care, risk prediction, patient stratification, precision medicine, home care and facilitating improved quality of life.

Engineering health supports the bridging of basic scientific progress, engineering development and innovation to clinical implementation. With continuous advancements in material science, computational methods, information technology, imaging, and micro- and nanobiotechnology we pursue preventive, interventive and therapeutic engineering solutions for improved health.
 

Engineering Health improves health by means of cutting-edge research and engineering development.

Focus areas


Biomaterials and biomechanics within Engineering Health primarily focuses on degenerative diseases and regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues, cells and biomaterials that replace them either temporarily to stimulate tissue regeneration or permanently, as implants, as well as developing and using natural and synthetic biomaterials as drug delivery systems.

Here also, mechanical properties as well as physical properties, such as permeability and diffusivity, become critical, which are connected and described in advanced computational models.

Biomedical imaging within Engineering health focus on

  • multimodal imaging – simultaneous production of signals for more than one imaging technique
  • minimization – to make modalities portable or to decrease the energy needed
  • faster acquisition – that enables novel applications and improved image quality
  • quantitative imaging – extraction of quantifiable features from medical images for the assessment of status of a disease, injury, or chronic condition relative to normal
  • super resolution imaging – techniques that increase the resolution of an image system beyond the physical boundaries

Recent developments also cover scientific breakthroughs on novel nanoparticle agents for magnetomotive contrast enhancement in high performance ultrasound imaging. 

Digital and data-driven health has only taken the first steps towards what will be possible in the future. We envision that research in tailored algorithms for extracting information from health data using domain-specific expertise together with explainable AI, will be of strategic importance. Our goal is to take a leading position on all steps from how medical data is generated to how large databases can be combined with intelligent algorithms to provide novel data-driven health services and solutions both for clinical research but also supporting the development of future medical devices.

The micro- and nanobiotechnology research front within Engineering Health extends from fundamental physics of fluids and light-nanostructure interactions, to clinical applications and basic biology, where fluid handling, biomarker detection, cell and extracellular vesicle separation, bioanalysis, and processing explores and benefits from miniaturization and scaling laws in confined space.

Common goals are improved health and patient care by the development of precision diagnostics and to contribute to the development of novel therapeutic modalities such as advanced personalized cell therapies.


Infrastructure

One of the infrastructures within the LTH Profile Area – Life Science Microfluidics – assists in training and custom development of microfluidic systems for researchers at Lund University. It encompasses clean room fabrication facilities, precision milling and 3D-printing expertise as well as fully equipped lab facilities for microfluidic component performance characterization. It is supported by Lund University, LTH and the Faculty of Medicine and is managed jointly by the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Faculty of Medicine.

Contact: Lars Wallman (Lund University's Research Portal)

People

The researchers within the area Engineering Health in Lund University's Research Portal

Participating departments:

  • Automatic Control
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Computer science
  • Design sciences
  • Electrical and Information Technology
  • Immunotechnology
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering Sciences

Coordinators

Thomas Laurell and Frida Sandberg

Links open in Lund University's Research Portal

In view of an aging society and the increasing demands on access to healthcare we need to find new solutions to alleviate the pressure on hospitals as well as primary care centers. Innovations that decentralize health care, without waiving quality, is a key demand for society.

The LTH Profile Area Engineering Health address these challenges in a multifaceted strategy where scientific excellence is key to provide new engineering solutions for medical needs in early diagnostics, point-of-care, risk prediction, patient stratification, precision medicine, home care and facilitating improved quality of life.

Engineering health supports the bridging of basic scientific progress, engineering development and innovation to clinical implementation. With continuous advancements in material science, computational methods, information technology, imaging, and micro- and nanobiotechnology we pursue preventive, interventive and therapeutic engineering solutions for improved health.
 

Engineering Health improves health by means of cutting-edge research and engineering development.

Focus areas


Biomaterials and biomechanics within Engineering Health primarily focuses on degenerative diseases and regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues, cells and biomaterials that replace them either temporarily to stimulate tissue regeneration or permanently, as implants, as well as developing and using natural and synthetic biomaterials as drug delivery systems.

Here also, mechanical properties as well as physical properties, such as permeability and diffusivity, become critical, which are connected and described in advanced computational models.

Biomedical imaging within Engineering health focus on

  • multimodal imaging – simultaneous production of signals for more than one imaging technique
  • minimization – to make modalities portable or to decrease the energy needed
  • faster acquisition – that enables novel applications and improved image quality
  • quantitative imaging – extraction of quantifiable features from medical images for the assessment of status of a disease, injury, or chronic condition relative to normal
  • super resolution imaging – techniques that increase the resolution of an image system beyond the physical boundaries

Recent developments also cover scientific breakthroughs on novel nanoparticle agents for magnetomotive contrast enhancement in high performance ultrasound imaging. 

Digital and data-driven health has only taken the first steps towards what will be possible in the future. We envision that research in tailored algorithms for extracting information from health data using domain-specific expertise together with explainable AI, will be of strategic importance. Our goal is to take a leading position on all steps from how medical data is generated to how large databases can be combined with intelligent algorithms to provide novel data-driven health services and solutions both for clinical research but also supporting the development of future medical devices.

The micro- and nanobiotechnology research front within Engineering Health extends from fundamental physics of fluids and light-nanostructure interactions, to clinical applications and basic biology, where fluid handling, biomarker detection, cell and extracellular vesicle separation, bioanalysis, and processing explores and benefits from miniaturization and scaling laws in confined space.

Common goals are improved health and patient care by the development of precision diagnostics and to contribute to the development of novel therapeutic modalities such as advanced personalized cell therapies.


More about

Links open in Lund University's Research Portal

Infrastructure

One of the infrastructures within the LTH Profile Area – Life Science Microfluidics – assists in training and custom development of microfluidic systems for researchers at Lund University. It encompasses clean room fabrication facilities, precision milling and 3D-printing expertise as well as fully equipped lab facilities for microfluidic component performance characterization. It is supported by Lund University, LTH and the Faculty of Medicine and is managed jointly by the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Faculty of Medicine.

Contact: Lars Wallman (Lund University's Research Portal)

People

The researchers within the area Engineering Health in Lund University's Research Portal

Participating departments:

  • Automatic Control
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Computer science
  • Design sciences
  • Electrical and Information Technology
  • Immunotechnology
  • Mathematical Sciences
  • Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering Sciences

Coordinators

Thomas Laurell and Frida Sandberg

Links open in Lund University's Research Portal